Massage Therapy

Massage Therapy

Practitioners:

Brian Reinke (920) 264-4235                     Jessica Johnson (920) 655-8510 

Kristin Kostreva (715) 923-3611                 Michael Weaver (920) 264-3218 

Pat Dinger (920) 562-0621                           Sandy Brunner (920) 639-1357

Stephanie Shevy (920) 672-8378                            

 

Massage Therapy is a “hands-on” treatment in which a therapist manipulates muscles and other soft tissues of the body to improve health and well-being. Varieties of massage range from gentle stroking and kneading of muscles and other soft tissues to deeper manual techniques. Massage has been practiced as a healing therapy for centuries in nearly every culture around the world. It helps relieve muscle tension, reduce stress, and evoke feelings of calmness. Although massage affects the body as a whole, it particularly influences the activity of the musculoskeletal, circulatory, lymphatic, and nervous systems.

25 REASONS TO GET A MASSAGE

1  Relieve stress

2  Relieve postoperative pain

3  Reduce anxiety

4  Manage low-back pain

5  Help fibromyalgia pain

6  Reduce muscle tension

7  Enhance exercise performance

8  Relieve tension headaches

9  Sleep better

10  Ease symptoms of depression

11  Improve cardiovascular health

12  Reduce pain of osteoarthritis

13  Decrease stress in cancer patients

14  Improve balance in older adults

15  Decrease rheumatoid arthritis pain

16  Temper effects of dementia

17  Promote relaxation

18  Lower blood pressure

19  Decrease symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

20  Help chronic neck pain

21  Lower joint replacement pain

22  Increase range of motion

23  Decrease migraine frequency

24  Improve quality of life in hospice care

25  Reduce chemotherapy-related nausea

Massage is good medicine.    

There are nearly 100 different massage and body work techniques. Each technique is uniquely designed to achieve a specific goal. The most common types practiced in the United States include:

Aromatherapy massage: Essential oils from plants are massaged into the skin to enhance the healing and r  elaxing effects of massage. Essential oils are believed to have a powerful effect on mood by stimulating two structures deep in the brain known to store emotions and memory.

Craniosacral massage: Gentle pressure is applied to the head and spine to correct imbalances and restore the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in these areas.

Lymphatic massage: Light, rhythmic strokes are used to improve the flow of lymph (colorless fluid that helps fight infection and disease) throughout the body. One of the most popular forms of lymphatic massage, manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), focuses on draining excess lymph. MLD is commonly used after surgery (such as a mastectomy for breast cancer) to reduce swelling.

Myofascial release: Gentle pressure and body positioning are used to relax and stretch the muscles, fascia (connective tissue), and related structures. Trained physical therapists and massage therapists use this technique.

On-site/chair massage: On-site massage therapists use a portable chair to deliver brief, upper body massages to fully-clothed people in offices and other public places.

Sports massage: Often used on professional athletes and other active individuals, sports massage can enhance performance and prevent and treat sports-related injuries.

Swedish massage: A variety of strokes and pressure techniques are used to enhance the flow of blood to the heart, remove waste products from the tissues, stretch ligaments and tendons, and ease physical and emotional tension.

Therapeutic Massage: Massage technique with the goal of relaxation and resolving underlying issues.

Trigger point massage: Pressure is applied to “trigger points” (tender areas where the muscles have been damaged) to alleviate muscle spasms and pain.

Integrative touch: A gentle form of massage therapy that uses gentle, non-circulatory techniques. It is designed to meet the needs of patients who are hospitalized or in hospice care. A gentle form of massage therapy that uses gentle, non-circulatory techniques. It is designed to meet the needs of patients who are hospitalized or in hospice care.

Compassionate touch: Combines one-on-one focused attention, intentional touch, and sensitive massage with communication to enhance the quality of life for elderly, ill, or dying patients. Combines one-on-one focused attention, intentional touch, and sensitive massage with communication to enhance the quality of life for elderly, ill, or dying patients.

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